Homebrewing Tips

  1. Blending Your Beer

    Blending Your Beer

    Blending beer is a way to make new what you’ve already got. You can blend different beer styles, barrel-aged and non-barrel-aged beers, portions of each batch of the same recipe, or various ages of the same recipe. Make a new beer that is even more delicious than its various parts.

    Read more »
  2. How to Brew Beer with Coffee

    How to Brew Beer with Coffee

    Looking for ways to keep your fall and winter beers bold and inviting? Bring some coffee into the mix! Whether you intend to make a beer that only features coffee alongside other notes, or a beer that is big on java flavor, we'll give you tips on how to achieve the beer you want.

    Read more »
  3. 3 Ways to Prevent Darkening Beer When Brewing with Extract

    3 Ways to Prevent Darkening Beer When Brewing with Extract

    Malt extract, in particular liquid malt extract or LME, is known to create a darker finished beer because it is a concentrated product created with heat and low water content. It allows for the brewer to skip the time- and attention- intensive processes of mashing and sparging, since these processes are completed to create extract.

    Read more »
  4. Is Homebrew or Extract "Twang" a Thing?

    Is Homebrew or Extract "Twang" a Thing?

    While homebrew or extract "twang" is a term in circulation, any cursory glance over a homebrew message board will reveal that some brewers believe in it, and some do not. Some brewers claim to notice it in varying severities across different brews, but guaranteed cause-and-effect connections aren't made. 

    Read more »
  5. Partial Mash versus Steeping with Specialty Grains

    Partial Mash versus Steeping with Specialty Grains

    Completing a partial mash and steeping with specialty grains are two very similar processes, so we thought we'd point out the small but crucial differences for our brewers. A great starting point is understanding the all-grain beer brewing process of "mashing," which is the process they are standing in for.

    Read more »
  6. Why is My Beer Flat?

    Why is My Beer Flat?

    Delicious beer is well-carbonated beer (according to style, of course). If you are finishing with less that fizzy beer, there are a couple of likely culprits. The two most common issues resulting in flat beer are...

    Read more »
  7. Batch Priming: Yes or No?

    Batch Priming: Yes or No?

    Batch priming refers to the process of adding your priming sugar (sugar which creates carbonation) to the entire "batch" of beer, instead of the individual bottles. Fans of batch priming list simplicity and consistent carbonation from bottle to bottle as the primary benefits. 

    Read more »
  8. Choosing Tea for Your Kombucha

    Choosing Tea for Your Kombucha

    Bacteria and yeast (the SCOBY) need sugar and tea for proper fermentation – the sugar acts as food, providing energy, while the tea is a natural multivitamin. Only tea that comes from the plant Camellia senensis provides the necessary nutrients for your SCOBY. 

    Read more »
  9. Mead: A Definition, Brief History, and Explanation of the Process

    Mead: A Definition, Brief History, and Explanation of the Process

    Mead - it's what medieval knights and ripped Norsemen drink in every super-edgy warrior film. It's what they serve at your local Renaissance fair. But it's got a whole lot more character and room for variability than the super-sweet-and-boozy persona for which it is known.

    Read more »
  10. Brewing Beer with Spices

    Brewing Beer with Spices

    Long before hops were ever used, many different spices were used in beer brewing for bittering and flavor. In fact, the history of beer produced without hops is approximately 8,000 years older than the history of beer produced with hops. 

    Read more »
Page