Cleaning Your Keg: Before opening the keg, vent the pressure by pulling up on the pressure release valve on top of the keg. This is a safety precaution – don’t skip this step! Remove all lines and connections, disassemble them, and set them aside in a cleanser bath. Remove the lid from the keg by pulling up on the handle that holds the lid onto the keg. If needed, give it a 90º turn to remove it. Set the lid and gasket aside in a cleanser bath. We recommend Craftmeister Oxygen Brewery Wash. Using a socket wrench or crescent wrench, remove the 2 connect posts from the keg. Be careful not to strip the screws. Also, take care not to lose the poppet valves. These are the spring mechanisms inside the posts. Place these parts in the cleanser bath, as well. Remove the dip tubes by pulling from the topside of the keg. There is a long one for beer and a short one for gas. Set the long one inside the keg (through the lid) and the short one in the cleanser bath. Inspect your corny keg O-rings (there are 5 total: 1 for the lid, 2 for the posts, 2 for the dip tubes). Clean them with a damp cloth or replace them if needed. Using a damp cloth, clean all keg parts. A line brush can be helpful for getting inside the dip tubes. Fill keg with 2 gallons of cleansing solution (prepare according to cleanser instructions). Use a carboy brush or a soft scrub pad (not steel wool) to clean the shell of the keg inside and out, paying close attention to the areas that are hidden to make sure they are cleaned thoroughly. Rinse and dry all parts according to the directions on your cleanser then reassemble your keg. Sanitizing Your Keg: Fill the keg with 2 gallons of room temperature water and 1 packet of No-Rinse Cleanser. Pour a small amount of solution from the keg to a bowl to sanitize the keg lid for about 1 minute. Attach the lid and shake the keg for about 1 minute. Attach the Co2 gas line (grey) and the beer line (black) to the keg and turn the Co2 up to 20 psi. Check for leaks by applying soapy water to each of the posts, around the lid, and to all connections on your CO2 setup. Any leaks will be indicated by bubbles from the soapy solution. To sanitize your beer line, simply keep the keg on 20 psi and dispense through the tap until it is empty. Remove your lines, vent the excess pressure with lid’s pressure release valve, and set the keg upside down to air-dry. Filling and Carbonating Your Beer: The Fast Method: Fill your keg using a length of vinyl tubing attached to your fermenter’s spigot. This tubing should reach the bottom of the keg to prevent oxidation. Replace the lid to the keg, attach your Co2 connection, and set the psi to 20 to check for leaks. Purge any oxygen left in the keg by opening the release valve while the Co2 is on for a few seconds. This will fill the headspace with Co2. Then disconnect the gas line. Chill your beer. Chilling it will allow the CO2 to dissolve into solution much easier. The colder the beer, the more CO2 it will hold. 38 - 42 F (3 - 5 C) is an average range for carbonation. Once chilled, return the gas line to the keg and set the psi to 30 psi and leave it for 24-48 hours in your refrigerator/kegerator. After a day or 2, lower the psi to 12, vent the keg of any excess Co2, attach your beer line and draw a sample. You may need to adjust psi for a proper pour. The Slow Method (recommended for more precise carbonation levels): Fill your keg using a length of vinyl tubing attached to your fermenter’s spigot. This tubing should reach the bottom of the keg to prevent oxidation. Replace the lid to the keg, attach your Co2 connection, and set the psi to 20 to check for leaks. Purge any oxygen left in the keg by opening the release valve while the Co2 is on for a few seconds. This will fill the headspace with Co2. Then disconnect the gas line. Chill your beer. Chilling it will allow the CO2 to dissolve into solution much easier. The colder the beer, the more CO2 it will hold. 38 - 42 F (3 - 5 C) is an average range for carbonation. Once chilled, return the gas line to the keg and set the psi to whatever pressure you are trying to reach for your beer (refer to chart below) and leave it for 5-10 days in your refrigerator/kegerator, testing for carbonation after 5 days (it may take up to 10 depending on temperature and setting). Using this method, it’s usually best to dispense the beer at the same pressure you carbonated, but you may have to adjust for a proper pour depending on factors such as temperature and altitude.